Flashback to Cliff Hague's Diaries in Planning 1986-2006

Tuesday, 02 June 2015 09:49

New Delhi - a public health disaster

Rate this item
(0 votes)

The chronic levels of air pollution derive substantially from the traffic that chokes the streets day and night. Children go to school at the peak of the emissions in the rush hour, exposing them to the most intense pollution of the day. Also many schools are located alongside major roads - good for access but bad for exposure to air pollution, not to mention road safety.

If childen were hit on this scale by a natural disaster the attention of the world would be focused on the city. The less dramatic but still insidious impacts of air pollution, and the potential to redress the problem through urban planning, pass largely unremarked, except by the experts. 

The World Health Organisation have called for greater awareness of health risks caused by air pollution, implementation of effective air pollution mitigation policies; and close monitoring of the situation in cities worldwide.

“Too many urban centres today are so enveloped in dirty air that their skylines are invisible,” said Dr Flavia Bustreo, WHO Assistant Director-General for Family, Children and Women's Health. “Not surprisingly, this air is dangerous to breathe. So a growing number of cities and communities worldwide are striving to better meet the needs of their residents - in particular children and the elderly."

Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute (CNCI), found that key indicators of respiratory health, lung function to palpitation, vision to blood pressure, children in Delhi, between four and 17 years of age, were worse off than their counterparts elsewhere - See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/landmark-study-lies-buried-how-delhis-poisonous-air-is-damaging-its-children-for-life/#sthash.7Pwkk6mZ.dpuf
Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute (CNCI), found that key indicators of respiratory health, lung function to palpitation, vision to blood pressure, children in Delhi, between four and 17 years of age, were worse off than their counterparts elsewhere - See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/landmark-study-lies-buried-how-delhis-poisonous-air-is-damaging-its-children-for-life/#sthash.7Pwkk6mZ.dpuf
Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute (CNCI), found that key indicators of respiratory health, lung function to palpitation, vision to blood pressure, children in Delhi, between four and 17 years of age, were worse off than their counterparts elsewhere - See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/landmark-study-lies-buried-how-delhis-poisonous-air-is-damaging-its-children-for-life/#sthash.7Pwkk6mZ.dpuf
Read 16010 times Last modified on Friday, 26 June 2015 15:09

Leave a comment



Anti-spam: complete the task