These are blogs written by Cliff Hague for the Innovation Circle Network.
 
www.innovationcircle.net 

Thursday, 01 March 2018 12:57

Science and Urban Climate Change

A paper in a leading scientific journal calls for much greater engagement of scientists in urban policy and practice.

Saturday, 10 February 2018 13:16

Urban expansion, public space and heritage

Today at the World Urban Forum in Kuala Lumpur I went into three events, which spanned a wide range of themes and places.Each in its own way provoked thoughts.

Friday, 14 October 2016 11:20

OBE

Earlier this week I was honoured to receive the OBE for services to planning, at an investiture at Buckingham Palace.

Published in News items

The Habitat 3 conference in Quito this month is a critical opportunity to shape the practice of planning globally.

China's slowing growth and rising debts have sent tremors through global markets. Urbanisation has been integral to the near double digit annual growth over recent years, so what does the slow down mean for regional and local development within China, and in particular for the local authorities?

We are building cities to attract investment, not cities for people to live in, argued David Harvey, the distinguished geographer, speaking in Montevideo.

Published in News items
Thursday, 05 November 2015 13:23

Habitat II, Istanbul 1996

Here is a "Diary" article that I wrote inspired by my participation in the second Habitat UN summit in 1996, when I was there representing RTPI as President.

Thursday, 17 September 2015 15:45

Sri Lanka plans "Megapolis" to boost growth

Sri Lanka is planning to develop a "megapolis" based on Colombo to boost its economy and compete with other South Asian nations.

Published in News items

A wide ranging international review of national urban policies highlights the importance to national development of coordinated planning and well-functioning urban areas. Urban planning is seen as an economic imperative. "The argument
that well-functioning urban areas can help to unleash the development potential of nations is more persuasive than the argument that urban policy is about alleviating poverty and meeting basic needs", says the report.

Informal development is now penetrating the formerly exclusive suburbs of Harare, Zimbabwe's main city. lLike many colonial cities the early planning of Harare sought to segregate areas by class and ethnicity. However, urbanisation and poverty are now resulting in green spaces in low density suburbs becoming the focus for informal housing that brings the poor to the doorsteps of the rich.

Published in News items
Page 1 of 2